Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Euroconsult nominates Natalia Larrea as new Director of Euroconsult US
Paris, Washington D.C., Montreal, Yohohama, Sydney, 18th August — Euroconsult...
Maptitude 2022 Released for Sales and Marketing Business Development
NEWTON, MA (USA) - Maptitude 2022, a major release of...
EVONA and USGIF Announce STEM Diversity Scholarship Winner
Space sector recruiter EVONA take another giant leap towards...
LiDAR technology confirms the existence of a “Lost City” in the Brazilian Amazon
APIACÁS, Brazil - The Brazilian Amazon may be the cradle...
New Esri Initiative Provides Free Geospatial Software for Nonprofits
Esri Small Nonprofit Organization Grant Initiative Will Offer Tech...

Utah’s Great Salt Lake dropped to its lowest recorded water level in July 2022 as a megadrought persists across the southwest, forcing the fast-growing city nearby to curb its water use. From space, satellite images show how water levels have fallen from 1985 to 2022, exposing large expanses of lakebed.

The image on the top was captured by US Landsat 5 satellite and shows the average extent of the lake from May-August 1985. Given the orbits didn’t cover the entire area of interest, an average of summer acquisitions with low cloud coverage lead to the processing of this image. The image on the bottom was captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission on July 4, 2022.

Image Credit: USGS/contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2022), processed by ESA



Comments are closed.