Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Cyient – BlueBird Joint Venture Launches its New Unmanned Aerial System, the Versatile WanderB VTOL at Aero India 2019
BANGALORE, India and HYDERABAD, India - Cyient Solutions & Systems...
Esri Publishes Switching to ArcGIS Pro from ArcMap
REDLANDS, Calif.- Esri, the global leader in location intelligence,...
GEO Jobe Continues Growth, Welcomes Timothy Michael as Sr. Solution Engineer
We’re pleased to have continued, sustained growth here at...
New Digital Maps Available for 54 Countries in the Americas
Updated and enhanced 2019 GfK map editions for North,...
Deseret UAS Partnership Awarded Highly Competitive NASA & FAA Programs
TOOELE COUNTY- The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) recently...

The Eye of the Sahara image is a mosaic of four different Landsat 8 scenes that show the geologic feature in false color. By blending visible and infrared wavelengths (bands), scientists can enhance the visibility of the various rock layers in contrast to the surrounding sand (yellow to white).

The Eye of the Sahara image is a mosaic of four different Landsat 8 scenes that show the geologic feature in false color. By blending visible and infrared wavelengths (bands), scientists can enhance the visibility of the various rock layers in contrast to the surrounding sand (yellow to white).

Located near the western edge of the Sahara Desert, the Eye of the Sahara is a feature that resembles a large eye when viewed from space. Also known as the Richat Structure or Guelb er Richat, the Eye is a symmetrical dome of eroded sedimentary and volcanic rock.

The outermost rings measure approximately 40 kilometers (25 miles) across. Persistent northeasterly winds keep much of the dome free from sand, exposing the various layers of rock. The circular feature was initially interpreted to be an asteroid impact structure, but most scientists have now concluded that it was caused by geologic uplift.

Comments are closed.