Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Woolpert Adds Vice President, Senior Strategic Consultant to ISO/TC 251 Asset Management Advisory Group
David Feuer and Bob Leitch are the most recent...
3 Keys to successful canopy penetration
Summer is here and with it comes the challenge...
Vaisala and FMI technology heads to Mars onboard NASA’s Perseverance rover
International collaboration takes Vaisala and the Finnish Meteorological Institute...
Solar Orbiter commissioned in orbit despite Covid-19
Stevenage  – Airbus has successfully completed the In-Orbit Commissioning...
Swift Navigation, Deutsche Telekom, Ericsson and Quectel Announce New Vision for Supporting 3GPP SSR Standard
SAN FRANCISCO - Swift Navigation, Deutsche Telekom, Ericsson and...

This image was captured by ESA’s Sentinel-2A satellite, showing Lake Amadeus, the largest salt lake in Australia’s Northern Territory, just 50 kilometers north of Uluru/Ayers Rock. (Credit: Copernicus Sentinel data (2015)/ESA)

This image was captured by ESA’s Sentinel-2A satellite, showing Lake Amadeus, the largest salt lake in Australia’s Northern Territory, just 50 kilometers north of Uluru/Ayers Rock. (Credit: Copernicus Sentinel data (2015)/ESA)

This image captured by Sentinel-2A on July 13, 2015, features Lake Amadeus in Australia’s Northern Territory.

It shows the variety of the sandy, rocky and salty formations within the lake. Approximately 180 kilometers long and 10 kilometers wide, Amadeus is the largest salt lake in the Northern Territory, just 50 kilometers north of Uluru/Ayers Rock.

Lake Amadeus contains up to 600 million tons of salt. However, harvesting isn’t feasible because of its remote location. Owing to the area’s aridity, the surface of Lake Amadeus often is a dry salt crust. When rainfall is sufficient, it becomes part of an east-flowing drainage system that eventually connects to the Finke River.

A UNESCO World Heritage Site and one of Australia’s most-recognizable landmarks, Uluru/Ayers Rock is a large sandstone rock formation standing 348 meters high, rising 863 meters above sea level and with a circumference of 9.4 kilometers.  

Also clearly visible in the lower-central part of the image are the Petermann Ranges. These mountains run 320 kilometers across the border between Western Australia and the southwest corner of the Northern Territory. Their highest point is 1,158 meters above sea level. The range was formed about 550 million years ago as compression folded a section of Earth’s crust.

 

Comments are closed.