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Meteorologists currently rely on radar and ground-based instruments that are unable to collect atmospheric data to build better forecasting models. A collection of universities partnered to create UAS technology that can collect such data.

Meteorologists currently rely on radar and ground-based instruments that are unable to collect atmospheric data to build better forecasting models. A collection of universities partnered to create UAS technology that can collect such data.

Oklahoma State University (OSU) as well as the universities of Oklahoma, Nebraska and Kentucky will share a $6 million, four-year grant from the National Science Foundation to develop a small Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) that improves weather forecasting by studying atmospheric physics.

“Use of unmanned aircraft will eventually be a common tool in both meteorology and atmospheric physics, but there is a lot of research that needs to be accomplished first in technical, operational and regulatory areas for that to happen,” noted Dr. Jamey Jacob, professor of aerospace engineering in OSU’s college of engineering, architecture and technology.

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