Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Industry players announce London Geospatial Week for 2020
Geospatial professionals have an exciting new week to look...
Seabed 2030 and World Ocean Council agree new partnership for sustainable stewardship of the oceans
London – A new partnership for sustainable stewardship of...
iGeolise Raise £3.2m Investment for Their Location Search and Mapping API
LONDON - Today iGeolise announce £3.2 million funding from...
thinkWhere Online Mapping Tool Helps Falkirk Residents Access Essential Services
Stirling, Scotland– Scotland's Falkirk Council has rolled out a...
Esri Poster Contest Winners Announced at AAG Annual Meeting
REDLANDS, Calif.- Esri, the global leader in location intelligence,...

KARI's EAV-3 takes off from its trailer while being pulled down the runway at an airport in southern Korea. (Credit: Business Korea)

KARI's EAV-3 takes off from its trailer while being pulled down the runway at an airport in southern Korea. (Credit: Business Korea)UAV

On Aug. 11, 2015, the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) announced that its EAV-3, a high-altitude UAV powered by solar cells, succeeded in flying into Earth’s stratosphere at 14 kilometers above sea level during its nine-hour flight. At such altitude, air density amounts to 53 percent of that contained at 10 kilometers, a common altitude for civilian aircraft, and the temperature is 30 degrees lower. However, the lack of clouds favors sunlight as an energy source.

EAV-3 is a 100-percent pollution-free aircraft that uses solar cells and secondary cells as energy sources in the stratosphere. A mono-crystal solar cell on top of the wing continually charges a secondary cell during flight, which is used as a source of energy. Wings are 20 meters long and weigh 53 kilograms.

“We are planning to acquire tech for solar-powered UAVs capable of remaining in the air at high altitudes for a long period of time to carry out tasks like terrestrial observations, meteorological observations and telecommunications relays, while remaining in the air for several weeks to months in the stratosphere,” said Kim Seung-ho and Go Jung-ik, heads of the research team.

 

Comments are closed.