Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Quantum Spatial Streamlines Access to Oregon’s High Resolution Imagery on New Online Portal
PORTLAND, Ore.- Quantum Spatial, Inc. (QSI), the nation’s largest...
Esri Releases Ready-to-Use US Census Bureau Data in ArcGIS Living Atlas
REDLANDS, Calif.- Esri, the global leader in location intelligence,...
XYO Network Headed to Space – Definitive Agreement Executed to Bring XYO Into Orbit With Launch of Blockchain Satellite on SpaceX Falcon 9
SAN DIEGO - XYO Network, the technology that bridges...
Accela Announces Experienced Technology Leader Gary Kovacs as CEO
SAN RAMON, Calif.- Accela, the leading provider of cloud-based solutions...
EagleView Remains Front Runner in Aerial Imagery with Acquisition of Spookfish
Bothell, WA  – EagleView, the leading provider of high-resolution...

A satellite image shows the coast of the Pacific Northwest, an area susceptible to tsunamis. (Credit: SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, ORBIMAGE)

A satellite image shows the coast of the Pacific Northwest, an area susceptible to tsunamis. (Credit: SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, ORBIMAGE)

Stretching offshore from northern California to British Columbia, the Cascadia subduction zone could slip at any time, causing a powerful earthquake and triggering a tsunami that would impact communities along the coast.

Scientists from multiple disciplines at the University of Washington (UW) and other institutions are learning more about this hazard. Dozens of UW scientists are part of the M9 Project, a research endeavor funded by the National Science Foundation to study the Cascadia subduction zone and communicate information about potential hazards to government officials and the public. Key goals of the M9 Project include mathematical modeling of tsunami waves, which tries to predict where and how an earthquake-triggered wave will affect the coast.

Read a related interview with two University of Washington scientists here.

Comments are closed.