Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
With its new generation LiDAR, Valeo makes autonomous mobility a reality
PARIS - Valeo, the global leader in driving assistance...
Ouster Expands to Japan and South Korea to Support Growing Demand for High-Resolution Digital Lidar Sensors
SAN FRANCISCO - Ouster, Inc. (NYSE: OUST) (“Ouster” or...
Burgex Mining Consultants Adds High Accuracy LiDAR Mapping Capabilities to Range of Services
SALT LAKE CITY -Burgex Inc. Mining Consultants is excited...
Esri Releases GIS for Science, Volume 3
REDLANDS, Calif.-Species are the foundation of a healthy planet,...
Valeo Introduces Its Third Generation LiDAR
DETROIT - Valeo, the global leader in advanced driving...
A satellite image shows the coast of the Pacific Northwest, an area susceptible to tsunamis. (Credit: SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, ORBIMAGE)

A satellite image shows the coast of the Pacific Northwest, an area susceptible to tsunamis. (Credit: SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, ORBIMAGE)

Stretching offshore from northern California to British Columbia, the Cascadia subduction zone could slip at any time, causing a powerful earthquake and triggering a tsunami that would impact communities along the coast.

Scientists from multiple disciplines at the University of Washington (UW) and other institutions are learning more about this hazard. Dozens of UW scientists are part of the M9 Project, a research endeavor funded by the National Science Foundation to study the Cascadia subduction zone and communicate information about potential hazards to government officials and the public. Key goals of the M9 Project include mathematical modeling of tsunami waves, which tries to predict where and how an earthquake-triggered wave will affect the coast.

Read a related interview with two University of Washington scientists here.

Comments are closed.