Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
EARTHDAY.ORG’s My Future My Voice Youth Ambassadors Receive 2021 Diana Award for their Exceptional Environmental Leadership
WASHINGTON, D.C. -- EARTHDAY.ORG’s My Future My Voice Youth...
Golden Software Improves Plotting Flexibility and Ease of Use in Latest Grapher Software Release
Grapher Beta Also Available   GOLDEN, Colorado, 8 December...
SPH Engineering Introduces UAV-based Remote Water Sampling System
December 8, 2021 (Riga, Latvia) - SPH Engineering introduces...
Woolpert Augments Fleet with 2nd King Air 300, Globally Expands Aerial Acquisition Capabilities
The AWR-certified turboprop aircraft increases the firm’s ability to...
Release of the 2021 Atlas of Canada World Map
For over a century, the Atlas of Canada has...
Photos from the 2015 Nepal earthquake are overlaid on a damage proxy map derived from COSMO-SkyMed satellite data. Colors show increasingly significant change in terrain/building properties (including surface roughness and soil moisture). (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Google/DigitalGlobe/CNES/Astrium/Amy MacDonald/Thornton Tomasetti)

Photos from the 2015 Nepal earthquake are overlaid on a damage proxy map derived from COSMO-SkyMed satellite data. Colors show increasingly significant change in terrain/building properties (including surface roughness and soil moisture). (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Google/DigitalGlobe/CNES/Astrium/Amy MacDonald/Thornton Tomasetti)

Researchers led by Sang-Ho Yun at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed a way to create damage maps from satellite imagery—even if images are taken at night or when skies are cloudy. They recently published the results of this new approach in the journal Seismological Research Letters.

“Our mapping system shows great potential, especially for isolated remote areas where there is no communication and the roads are blocked,” said Yun. “Those are the communities in desperate need of help, and our maps could help responders provide efficient assistance.”

Yun and colleagues used data from the Italian Space Agency’s COSMO-SkyMed system and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s ALOS-2 satellite.

Using software developed at JPL, researchers produced damage proxy maps covering an area near Kathmandu, Nepal. For each dataset, they examined the similarities between two radar images: two archival images from before the earthquake and one taken after. The software helped generate a distribution of colored pixels on a transparent background overlaid on top of maps from Google Earth.

“The colors are determined by the change between the before and after radar images,” added Yun. “The more the images are different, the redder the image.”

Comments are closed.