Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
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Tiny silicon nano-wire towers make up dark regions of the flexible Fresnel zone lenses, and each individual lens resembles a bull’s-eye of alternating light and dark. Arrays of lenses formed within a flexible polymer bend and stretch into different configurations. (Credit: Hongrui Jiang)

Tiny silicon nano-wire towers make up dark regions of the flexible Fresnel zone lenses, and each individual lens resembles a bull’s-eye of alternating light and dark. Arrays of lenses formed within a flexible polymer bend and stretch into different configurations. (Credit: Hongrui Jiang)

Drawing inspiration from an insect’s multi-faceted eye, University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers created miniature lenses with vast range of vision.

Their new approach created the first-ever flexible Fresnel zone plate microlenses with a wide field of view—a development that could allow everything from surgical scopes to security cameras to capture a broader perspective at a fraction the size required by conventional lenses. An array of the miniature lenses rolled into a cylinder can capture a panorama image covering a 170-degree field of view.

Read more here.

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