Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Golden Software Enhances Grapher Package with Improved Axes, Plotting, and 3D Functionality
GOLDEN, Colorado – Golden Software, a developer of affordable...
Esri India Marches Ahead with 51% Indian Ownership
New Delhi: Esri India, the country's leading Geographic Information...
Trimble RTX Integrity Validates Positioning Data Accuracy to Support Safety-Critical Applications
Providing Even More Reliable Measurements for Users of Trimble...
Esri Renews NTIS Partnership Supporting White House Priorities with Access to Geographic Data
REDLANDS, Calif.— The Biden administration has prioritized goals relating...
NVIDIA and Partners Build Out Universal Scene Description to Accelerate Industrial Metaverse and Next Wave of AI
  NVIDIA today announced a broad initiative to evolve Universal...
Scientists used observations from NOAA’s North American air-sampling network to track surprisingly high levels of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), a banned chemical known to deplete the ozone layer (pictured). (Credit: NASA)

Scientists used observations from NOAA’s North American air-sampling network to track surprisingly high levels of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), a banned chemical known to deplete the ozone layer (pictured). (Credit: NASA)

Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), once commonly used as a cleaning agent, is a known air toxin that eats away at the ozone layer. Its production has been banned for many years, but a new CIRES and NOAA study reports those rates are still 30-100 times higher than amounts reported to emission inventories.

“We’ve been scratching our heads, trying to understand why,” said NOAA scientist Stephen Montzka. “When we look at the amounts produced and destroyed, we would expect the chemical’s global concentration to be decreasing at a rate of nearly 4 percent per year. But it’s only decreasing at 1 percent per year. So what’s happening?”

The study suggests that the source of the unexpected emissions in the U.S. appears associated with the production of chlorinated chemicals (such as those ultimately used to create things such as Teflon and PVC). The new analysis was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

 

Comments are closed.