Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
GEO Business postponed until May 2021
Following GEO Business organiser Diversified Communications UK has confirmed...
NV5 Awarded $3 Million in Geospatial Contracts to Support Water Conservation
HOLLYWOOD, Fla. - NV5 Global, Inc. (the “Company” or...
Automated Farming: XAG Introduces Rice Seeding Drone to Mitigate Labour Shortage
GUANGZHOU, China - With the farming population decreasing and...
ASPRS GEO WEEK 2020 Technical Program is Going Virtual in June
The American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing: The...
Prius Intelli Opens Doors to Finely Detailed and Affordable Aerial Imagery
FT. WORTH, Texas - The need for clear, detailed...

On the left, La Niña cools off the ocean surface (greens and blues) in winter 1988. On the right, El Niño warms the ocean surface (oranges and reds) in winter 1997. (Courtesy of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

On the left, La Niña cools off the ocean surface (greens and blues) in winter 1988. On the right, El Niño warms the ocean surface (oranges and reds) in winter 1997. (Courtesy of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

A study published in Nature Communications suggests that  El Niño and La Niña weather patterns could lead to at least a doubling of extreme droughts and floods in California later this century. The study also predicts more-frequent extreme weather events.

A better understanding of what gives rise to El Niño and La Niña—together known as El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO)—might help California predict and prepare for more frequent droughts and floods in the coming century.

“Wet and dry years in California are linked to El Niño and La Niña. That relationship is getting stronger,” said atmospheric scientist Jin-Ho Yoon of the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. “Our study shows that ENSO will be exhibiting increasing control over California weather.”

For more information, click here.

Comments are closed.