Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Maxar Secures NOAA Approval to Provide Non-Earth Imaging Services to Government and Commercial Customers
WESTMINSTER, Colo.- Maxar Technologies (NYSE:MAXR) (TSX:MAXR), provider of comprehensive...
AEye Announces Groundbreaking Immersive Lidar Experience for Attendees at CES 2023
DUBLIN, Calif.- AEye, Inc. (NASDAQ: LIDR), a global leader in...
WIMI Hologram Academy: Multi-Dimensional Holographic Vision Opens A New Chapter In Cyberspace Mapping
HONG KONG - WIMI Hologram Academy, working in partnership...
Foursquare to Power Geospatial Data Visualization in Amazon SageMaker
NEW YORK-Foursquare, the leading independent location technology company, exclusively...
UK govt funds rocket that could allow us to escape solar system
LONDON- DECEMBER 2022:  Pulsar Fusion, a UK rocket company that...
On the left, La Niña cools off the ocean surface (greens and blues) in winter 1988. On the right, El Niño warms the ocean surface (oranges and reds) in winter 1997. (Courtesy of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

On the left, La Niña cools off the ocean surface (greens and blues) in winter 1988. On the right, El Niño warms the ocean surface (oranges and reds) in winter 1997. (Courtesy of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

A study published in Nature Communications suggests that  El Niño and La Niña weather patterns could lead to at least a doubling of extreme droughts and floods in California later this century. The study also predicts more-frequent extreme weather events.

A better understanding of what gives rise to El Niño and La Niña—together known as El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO)—might help California predict and prepare for more frequent droughts and floods in the coming century.

“Wet and dry years in California are linked to El Niño and La Niña. That relationship is getting stronger,” said atmospheric scientist Jin-Ho Yoon of the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. “Our study shows that ENSO will be exhibiting increasing control over California weather.”

For more information, click here.

Comments are closed.