Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
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Bluesky’s UAV Flight-Restriction Map is designed to provide a “first stop” reference for commercial operators of UAVs. The color-coded map uses a traffic-light system to identify different zones: “No Fly Zones” in red, areas close to no fly zones where further advice should be sought in amber, and “Free Fly” zones in green. (Credit: Bluesky)

Bluesky’s UAV Flight-Restriction Map is designed to provide a “first stop” reference for commercial operators of UAVs. The color-coded map uses a traffic-light system to identify different zones: “No Fly Zones” in red, areas close to no fly zones where further advice should be sought in amber, and “Free Fly” zones in green. (Credit: Bluesky)

Aerial mapping company Bluesky produced a prototype map showing where it may be unsafe or even illegal to fly Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), commonly referred to as drones.  Bluesky combined expertise in flight planning and 3D aerial mapping with various geographic datasets to come up with the concept of a UAV Flight-Restriction Map for the United Kingdom (UK).

The map is designed for commercial operators of UAVs and includes “No Fly Zones,” areas where further advice should be sought as well as areas where no restrictions on flying are currently in place.

Operators of UAVs in the UK must comply with Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) regulations if they plan to undertake “aerial work,” while those equipped for data acquisition and surveillance must obtain permission before “commencing a flight in a congested area or in proximity to people or property.” An overriding, all encompassing CAA Article also provides guidance in that a “person must not recklessly or negligently cause or permit an aircraft to endanger any person or property,” while other restrictions cover the dropping of articles or animals, minimum distances when flying near people or properties, and references to the Data Protection Act.

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