Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Map of the month: GfK Purchasing Power Europe 2017
Europeans have an average of €13,937 available for spending...
.Earth Domain Celebrates Second Anniversary By Making a Positive Impact Both Online and Offline
Interlink Co., Ltd., the official operator of the .Earth...
SSL Selected to Conduct Power and Propulsion Study for NASA’s Deep Space Gateway Concept
PALO ALTO, Calif. - SSL, a business unit of...
Esri Collaborates with Mobileye to Bring Real-Time Sensor Data to Public Transit
REDLANDS, Calif.— Esri, the global leader in spatial analytics,...
CTIA Calls on FAA to Recognize That Commercial Wireless Networks Offer Best Platform to Support Fast-Growing Drone Market
WASHINGTON - CTIA, the wireless association, today called on the...

A natural-color image captured on March 18, 2016, by ESA’s Sentinel-2A shows the various river tributaries, interconnected mangrove forests and fertile floodplains of the Sundarbans. (Credit: Contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2016), processed by ESA)

A natural-color image captured on March 18, 2016, by ESA’s Sentinel-2A shows the various river tributaries, interconnected mangrove forests and fertile floodplains of the Sundarbans. (Credit: Contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2016), processed by ESA)

The Sundarbans, comprising southern Bangladesh and a small part of the Indian state of west Bengal, include approximately 10,000 square kilometers of mangrove and swamp forests—the world’s largest single chunk of tidal halophytic mangrove forest.

In this image captured by the European Space Agency (ESA) Sentinel-2A satellite, the Sundarbans appear in dark shades of green, while adjacent areas in brighter colors are densely populated and dominated by agriculture.

This area lies on the Bay of Bengal, the world’s largest bay. A number of large rivers, including the Ganges, its tributaries and various other rivers, all flow into its waters, forming the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta.

The Sundarbans National Park, established in 1984 and a designated UNESCO World Heritage Site, is a core region within the Bengal Tiger Reserve. The almost-extinct Bengal tiger, the world’s second-largest tiger, is the national animal of Bangladesh.

 

Comments are closed.