Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
BlackSky Announces Next Generation Dual Payload Satellite Architecture to Deliver High Resolution and Nighttime Imaging Capabilities
HERNDON, Va.- BlackSky, a leading provider of global monitoring...
Draganfly Selected as Sole Provider of Smart Vital Sign and Social Distancing Equipment
Los Angeles, California - Draganfly Inc. (OTCQB: DFLYF) (CSE:...
Esri and AfroChampions Launch Partnership to Promote GIS in Africa
Redlands, Calif., United States:  Esri, the global leader in location...
Verizon deploys remote network-connected drone during Big Hollow Wildfire
PORTLAND, Ore.- The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) granted Skyward,...
United Launches Online ‘Map Search’ Feature, A First Among U.S. Airlines
CHICAGO - Let's say you live in Chicago, have $250 to spend...

 

Click image to enlarge.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite captured this natural-color image on Sept. 23, 2011.

The dust plumes sport a wave-like appearance—bands of thick dust alternating with bands of relatively clear air. Some waves extend westward while others curve toward the south in giant arcs. At the end of one curving wave of dust, a line of clouds extends southward over the sea. These ribbon-like patterns might result from atmospheric waves.

Sand seas sprawl over much of Mauritania, and the abundant sand provides plentiful material for dust storms. This dust storm hasn’t yet reached Cape Verde, which lies to the southwest, but the dust appears headed in that general direction.

NASA image courtesy MODIS Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC. Caption by Michon Scott.

Comments are closed.