Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Spacecraft Launch Activity Hit a 20-Year High in 2020
In its newly released quarterly issue of “The Space...
XAG Suggests Drones Could Outsmart Locust Swarms at Night
GUANGZHOU, China - The UN warned last week that East Africa remains...
Red Cat signs Letter of Intent to acquire Skypersonic Inc., the developer of a remote transoceanic piloting software system for the drone industry
ORLANDO, Fla.- Red Cat Holdings, Inc. (OTCQB: RCAT) ("Red Cat"),...
NV5 Geospatial and Oklahoma DoT to Showcase Innovative Applications of Aerial Lidar During TRB Annual Meeting
HOLLYWOOD, Fla.– NV5 Geospatial, North America’s largest provider of...
ABB sensor onboard SpaceX rocket to detect greenhouse gas emissions
An optical sensor manufactured by ABB was deployed last...

Click on image to enlarge.

The varied shades in this image of the North Sea are likely due to a combination of factors. Near coastal estuaries, sediments probably lend significant color to the water, according to Norman Kuring of the Ocean Color Team at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. “The North Sea is relatively shallow and can be subject to heavy seas and strong tidal currents, so re-suspension of bottom sediments is probably not uncommon, especially after storms.”

Kuring adds that another factor near the coast may be dissolved organic matter, sometimes called gelbstoff. Resulting from decaying bits of once-living organisms, dissolved organic matter can color ocean waters over a wide enough area to appear in satellite imagery.

Farther out to sea, the blue-green shades may result from a mixture of re-suspended sediment and phytoplankton—microscopic marine plants that thrive along coastlines and continental shelves.

 

Source: NASA

Comments are closed.