Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Abu Dhabi Government concludes participation at Esri User Conference in San Diego
ABU DHABI - The Abu Dhabi Government has concluded...
Special Aerospace Services Unveils Restored Apollo Test Capsule in Colorado
ARVADA, Colorado, USA – Special Aerospace Services LLC (SAS)...
Leica Geosystems Introduces New Generation of Manual Construction Total Stations
The new Leica iCON manual total stations digitalise measurement...
Japan’s Terra Drone gains footing in Central Asia with investment in leading Kazakh drone company KazUAV
Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan – July 18, 2019 – Japan-based Terra...
SOLV3D Announces New Product Branding and the Addition of a Widget for Esri ArcGIS Enterprise™
CALGARY, AB – SOLV3D Announces New Product Branding and...

October 30, 2018
Rectangular Icebergs

image

Operation IceBridge, NASA’s longest-running aerial survey of polar ice, flew over the northern Antarctic Peninsula on Oct. 16, 2018. During the survey designed to assess changes in the ice height of several glaciers draining into the Larsen A, B and C embayments, IceBridge senior support scientist Jeremy Harbeck spotted a very sharp-angled, tabular iceberg floating among sea ice just off the Larsen C ice shelf.

“I thought it was pretty interesting; I often see icebergs with relatively straight edges, but I’ve not really seen one before with two corners at such right angles like this one had,” said Harbeck. The rectangular iceberg appeared to be freshly calved from Larsen C, which in July 2017 released the massive A68 iceberg, a chunk of ice about the size of the state of Delaware.

“I was actually more interested in capturing the A68 iceberg that we were about to fly over, but I thought this rectangular iceberg was visually interesting and fairly photogenic, so on a lark, I just took a couple photos,” added Harbeck.

The flight originated from Punta Arenas, Chile, as part of a five-week-long IceBridge deployment, which began Oct. 10 and is scheduled to conclude Nov. 18.

Photo credit: NASA/Jeremy Harbeck

Comments are closed.