Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Frequency Electronics, Inc. Awarded $5.9M Lockheed Martin Contract To Qualify Atomic Clocks for Potential Use on Next Gen GPS IIIF Satellites
MITCHEL FIELD, N.Y.- As a risk reduction effort for...
GA-ASI Part of Aviation Week Laureate Award Winning Team
SAN DIEGO  – Last night at the Aviation Week...
RoboSense Provides LiDAR to GACHA — First Autonomous Driving Shuttle Bus For All Weather Conditions Co-Developed by MUJI & Sensible 4
SHENZHEN, China - RoboSense http://www.robosense.ai, a leader in LiDAR...
Velodyne Lidar CEO Wins Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers’ Autos2050 Award
SAN JOSE, Calif.-The Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers (Auto Alliance),...
FARO® Releases FARO ZONE 3D 2019 for Public Safety
LAKE MARY, Fla. - FARO® (NASDAQ: FARO), the world's most...

NASA’s MODIS instrument provided data that tie an underwater volcanic eruption in the Kermadec Islands on July 17 and 18 to a cluster of earthquakes in the area. Click on image to enlarge.

A month’s worth of satellite imagery revealed the source of giant chunks of floating pumice up to two feet thick and a kilometer wide, surprising the crew of the New Zealand ship HMNZS Canterbury during its early August voyage from Auckland to Raoul Island.

Although the pumice was spread over a vast area of the South Pacific, the origin was a mystery to the ship’s crew. An undersea volcano several hundred kilometers to the north of the pumice—Monowai—had erupted on Aug. 3, but an airline pilot reported seeing pumice as early as Aug. 1.
Two data sources provided clues to pinpoint the volcano: earthquake records and satellite imagery. After reports of the pumice rafts surfaced, scientists from Tahiti and New Zealand’s GNS Science connected the eruption with a cluster of earthquakes in the Kermadec Islands on July 17 and 18.

Read the full story.

Comments are closed.