Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
EARTHDAY.ORG’s My Future My Voice Youth Ambassadors Receive 2021 Diana Award for their Exceptional Environmental Leadership
WASHINGTON, D.C. -- EARTHDAY.ORG’s My Future My Voice Youth...
Golden Software Improves Plotting Flexibility and Ease of Use in Latest Grapher Software Release
Grapher Beta Also Available   GOLDEN, Colorado, 8 December...
SPH Engineering Introduces UAV-based Remote Water Sampling System
December 8, 2021 (Riga, Latvia) - SPH Engineering introduces...
Woolpert Augments Fleet with 2nd King Air 300, Globally Expands Aerial Acquisition Capabilities
The AWR-certified turboprop aircraft increases the firm’s ability to...
Release of the 2021 Atlas of Canada World Map
For over a century, the Atlas of Canada has...

New data from NASA’s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument aboard the Aqua satellite shows the movement high in the atmosphere of carbon monoxide associated with fires in the Amazon region of Brazil.

This time series maps carbon monoxide at an altitude of 18,000 feet (5,500 meters) from Aug. 8-22, 2019. As the series progresses, the carbon monoxide plume grows in the northwest Amazon region then drifts in a more concentrated plume toward the southeastern part of the country.

Each “day” in the series is made by averaging three days’ worth of measurements, a technique used to eliminate data gaps. Green indicates concentrations of carbon monoxide at approximately 100 parts per billion by volume (ppbv); yellow, at about 120 ppbv; and dark red, at about 160 ppbv. Local values can be significantly higher.

A pollutant that can travel large distances, carbon monoxide can persist in the atmosphere for about a month. At the high altitude mapped in these images, the gas has little effect on the air we breathe; however, strong winds can carry it downward to where it can significantly impact air quality. Carbon monoxide plays a role in both air pollution and climate change. 

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Comments are closed.