Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Reimagining Michael Baker International to Accelerate Growth and Innovation
BELLEVUE, Wash. - EagleView Technologies, Inc., a portfolio company...
Dynam.AI Unveils Vizlab, a Next-Generation AI Platform with Customizable Real-World Machine Learning Capabilities
Data scientists are encouraged to join the early access...
HawkEye360 to Deliver Large Data Files Over LEO Satellites using BitRipple Technology
BitRipple Inc., a provider of Metaverse solutions that enable...
Phase One Names Remote Vision as Swiss Reseller of Drone Payloads
Comprehensive Provider of UAV Solutions   COPENHAGEN – Phase One,...
NASA and University of Arizona OSIRIS-REx Team Selected to Receive 2022 John L. ’Jack’ Swigert, Jr., Award for Space Exploration
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo.  — Space Foundation, a nonprofit advocate...

On Dec. 18, 2018, a large “fireball”—the term used for exceptionally bright meteors that are visible over a wide area—exploded about 16 miles (26 kilometers) above the Bering Sea. The explosion unleashed an estimated 173 kilotons of energy—more than 10 times the energy of the atomic bomb blast over Hiroshima during World War II.

Two NASA instruments aboard the Terra satellite captured images of the remnants of the large meteor. The image sequence shows views from five of nine cameras on the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument taken a few minutes after the event. The shadow of the meteor’s trail through Earth’s atmosphere, cast on the cloud tops and elongated by the low sun angle, is to the northwest. The orange-tinted cloud that the fireball left behind by super-heating the air it passed through can be seen below and to the right of the GIF’s center.

The Dec. 18 fireball was the most powerful meteor to be observed since 2013. However, given its altitude and the remote area over which it occurred, the object posed no threat to anyone on the ground. Fireball events are actually fairly common and are recorded in the NASA Center for Near Earth Object Studies database.  

Image Credit: NASA/GSFC/LaRC/JPL-Caltech, MISR Team

Comments are closed.