Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
UP42 Partners with Intermap to Bring High-Resolution Elevation Data to UP42’s Geospatial Marketplace
BERLIN, Germany – UP42 is pleased to announce that...
NASA Funds Projects to Make Geosciences Data More Accessible
NASA has funded 11 new projects as part of...
Dewberry’s Sid Pandey Appointed to URISA Vanguard Cabinet
The Urban and Regional Information Systems Association (URISA) has...
Fugro receives US President’s ‘E’ Award for export growth
Fugro in the US has been granted the President’s...
Industry leaders Parrot and Pix4D unite to offer the most complete professional solutions with ANAFI USA
ANAFI USA and the Pix4D software suite now offer...

On Dec. 18, 2018, a large “fireball”—the term used for exceptionally bright meteors that are visible over a wide area—exploded about 16 miles (26 kilometers) above the Bering Sea. The explosion unleashed an estimated 173 kilotons of energy—more than 10 times the energy of the atomic bomb blast over Hiroshima during World War II.

Two NASA instruments aboard the Terra satellite captured images of the remnants of the large meteor. The image sequence shows views from five of nine cameras on the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument taken a few minutes after the event. The shadow of the meteor’s trail through Earth’s atmosphere, cast on the cloud tops and elongated by the low sun angle, is to the northwest. The orange-tinted cloud that the fireball left behind by super-heating the air it passed through can be seen below and to the right of the GIF’s center.

The Dec. 18 fireball was the most powerful meteor to be observed since 2013. However, given its altitude and the remote area over which it occurred, the object posed no threat to anyone on the ground. Fireball events are actually fairly common and are recorded in the NASA Center for Near Earth Object Studies database.  

Image Credit: NASA/GSFC/LaRC/JPL-Caltech, MISR Team

Comments are closed.