Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Esri Ireland partners with Bluesky to enhance its digital mapping offering in Ireland
Esri Ireland, the market leader in Geographic Information Systems...
GSSI Updates to StructureScan™ Mini XT GPR Kit and Palm XT Antenna
GSSI, the world’s leading manufacturer of ground penetrating radar...
MGISS Helps Northumbrian Water Mitigate Risk from Trees
Liverpool, UK - Northumbrian Water using satellite positioning and...
Kratos Introduces OpenSpace™ Virtual Network Functions for Earth Observation Satellite Missions
SAN DIEGO - Kratos Defense & Security Solutions, Inc....
Hivemapper Builds Global Decentralized Mapping Network, Offers Cash for Aerial and Ground-Level 3D Video
BURLINGAME, Calif.-Hivemapper, the company building an intelligent, global decentralized...

October 2, 2017
Melting Greenland Glacier

image

The European Space Agency (ESA) Copernicus Sentinel-2A satellite collected this false-color image over the jagged islands along the west coast of Greenland on Aug. 8, 2017.

Covering more than 2 million square kilometers, Greenland is the world’s largest island and home to the second largest ice sheet after Antarctica. But the ice sheets are sensitive to changes in climate, and rising temperatures are causing them to melt faster.

Scientists use Earth-observing satellites to track the ice loss. Between 2011 and 2014, Greenland lost approximately 1,000 billion metric tons of ice, corresponding to a 0.75-millimeter contribution to global sea-level rise each year.

On the right side of this image, the Nordenskiold Glacier is just one of many glaciers draining Greenland’s ice sheet. Vegetation appears red in this false-color image, as the land here is covered by grasses and low-lying plants. Swirls of light blue in the water are suspended fine sediment produced by the abrasion of glaciers rubbing against rock, called “glacier milk.”

(Photo Credit: Copyright contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2017), processed by ESA)

Comments are closed.