Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Intermap Technologies Meets Standards to Trade on the OTCQX® Best Market
Begins trading today, creating more liquidity, transparency and opportunity...
OGC Membership approves and publishes minor update to GeoPackage
The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) membership has approved and...
GAF Has Been Awarded A Multi-Year Contract By the German Federal State of Saxony-Anhalt
Munich -GAF AG has won the first European call...
Ibeo Automotive Systems Tests LiDAR Systems for Autonomous Driving in Berlin and Beijing
Hamburg – The LiDAR sensor specialist from Hamburg Ibeo...
Airbus Imagery Supports IBM Efforts to Provide Vegetation Insights for Grid Reliability
Airbus now provides very high-resolution satellite imagery to The...

Click on image to enlarge.

NASA’s Operation IceBridge scientists have wrapped up another season of their six-year polar ice survey. After weeks of cruising low over the ice, they usually return with stacks of jaw-dropping photos of rarely seen parts of the world—this spring’s expedition was no exception.

IceBridge Project Scientist Michael Studinger photographed this ice-covered fjord on Baffin Island, with Davis Strait in the background.

The IceBridge team’s destinations this spring included Greenland, Alaska and the Arctic Ocean. During a series of flights between March 18 and May 2, scientists aboard NASA’s P-3B flying laboratory got close-up views of everything from sea ice to tidewater glaciers to ice caps.

As always, the belly of the plane was packed with radars, altimeters, gravimeters and an array of sensors designed to yield a 3-D view of Arctic ice. But scientists on the plane also had some less exotic sensors with them—cameras!

Images courtesy of NASA/Michael Studinger.

View more photos from Michael Studinger, IceBridge project scientist.

Comments are closed.