Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Intermap Technologies Meets Standards to Trade on the OTCQX® Best Market
Begins trading today, creating more liquidity, transparency and opportunity...
OGC Membership approves and publishes minor update to GeoPackage
The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) membership has approved and...
GAF Has Been Awarded A Multi-Year Contract By the German Federal State of Saxony-Anhalt
Munich -GAF AG has won the first European call...
Ibeo Automotive Systems Tests LiDAR Systems for Autonomous Driving in Berlin and Beijing
Hamburg – The LiDAR sensor specialist from Hamburg Ibeo...
Airbus Imagery Supports IBM Efforts to Provide Vegetation Insights for Grid Reliability
Airbus now provides very high-resolution satellite imagery to The...

The “day-night band” on Suomi NPP's Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite detects light wavelengths from green to near-infrared. Click on image to enlarge.

Hurricane Sandy made landfall along the southern New Jersey coast on the evening of Oct. 29, 2012. The Suomi NPP satellite acquired the accompanying image of the storm around 3:35 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time on October 30. The full moon, which exacerbated the water height at the time of the storm surge, lit up the tops of the clouds.
Sandy’s clouds stretched from the Atlantic Ocean westward to Chicago. Clusters of lights gave away the locations of cities throughout the region, but along the East Coast, clouds obscured city lights, many of which were out due to the storm. On October 30, CNN reported that several millions of customers in multiple states were without electricity.

As the storm came ashore, it continued to pack strong wings—roughly 85 miles (140 kilometers) per hour. Tide gauges recorded storm-surge heights of 12.4 feet (3.8 meters) at Kings Point, N.Y.

Image courtesy of NASA.

Read the full story.

Comments are closed.