Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Galileo is Paving the Way Towards Next Generation Applications
Marseille – While the Earth’s atmosphere and ground surfaces...
GeoCue Enables Third Party GNSS Use with Phantom 4 RTK
Huntsville, AL – GeoCue Group (via its wholly owned...
University of Alaska, GeoNorth Information Systems, Lockheed Martin Partner to Collect Arctic Surveillance Data for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency
FAIRBANKS, Alaska - The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) awarded GeoNorth...
Sentera Announces Precision Ag Solution Price Promotion
MINNEAPOLIS - In preparation for the 2019 growing season, Sentera...
Square Foot Photography Emerges as Top Commercial Real Estate Photo Provider
AUSTIN, Texas - Square Foot Photography has been gaining nationwide...

 

Click on image to enlarge.

This natural-color image was captured by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor on NASA’s Terra satellite onNov. 30, 2011. According to Patrick Minnis, a cloud expert at NASA’s Langley Research Center, there are at least three layers of clouds in the image. The lowest layer is a marine stratus (stratocumulus) deck that covers the lower left two-thirds of the image.

“The clouds look like whipped, mashed potatoes with swirls and bright peaks,” Minnis said. “The bright peaks indicate glaciation—freezing of the super-cooled cloud droplets. The swirls are reflective of eddies in the low-level wind fields.”

Just above (or perhaps continuous with) the marine layer, parallel wave patterns mark a brighter layer of stratus clouds that cover the other third of scene. Above it all, in the upper right quadrant, a high cirrus cloud throws shadows on the clouds below.

Tom Arnold, an atmospheric scientist based at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, explained that marine stratus clouds can form (and persist) where there is a meeting between a cold ocean surface, some wind and a strong temperature inversion at the top of the atmospheric boundary layer (about 2,000 to 3000 feet).

“The cold ocean cools and moistens the low-level air, making the low cloud base possible,” Arnold noted. “The wind helps lift the air, and the temperature inversion acts like a kind of cap on the cloud layer, preventing much vertical mixing with the warmer, drier and more stable air immediately above the boundary layer.”

The temperature inversion layer is a product of a large area of high pressure that causes air to slowly sink, according to Arnold. The sinking air compresses the air—and thus warms and dries it—forming the temperature inversion layer over the top of the colder ocean-cooled air.

Source: NASA

Comments are closed.