Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Esri Ireland partners with Bluesky to enhance its digital mapping offering in Ireland
Esri Ireland, the market leader in Geographic Information Systems...
GSSI Updates to StructureScan™ Mini XT GPR Kit and Palm XT Antenna
GSSI, the world’s leading manufacturer of ground penetrating radar...
MGISS Helps Northumbrian Water Mitigate Risk from Trees
Liverpool, UK - Northumbrian Water using satellite positioning and...
Kratos Introduces OpenSpace™ Virtual Network Functions for Earth Observation Satellite Missions
SAN DIEGO - Kratos Defense & Security Solutions, Inc....
Hivemapper Builds Global Decentralized Mapping Network, Offers Cash for Aerial and Ground-Level 3D Video
BURLINGAME, Calif.-Hivemapper, the company building an intelligent, global decentralized...

Flying hundreds of miles above Earth, astronauts aboard the International Space Station photographed Lake Hazlett and Lake Willis in Western Australia's Great Sandy Desert. Hundreds of ephemeral salt lakes are peppered throughout the arid Australian Outback. When occasional floodwaters pour into the lakebeds and then evaporate, they leave salt mineral deposits and create bright, expansive layers that are readily visible from space, as seen in this image taken by the Expedition 52 crew on the station.

The reddish-brown linear sand dunes are slightly higher in elevation (5-10 feet; 1.5-3 meters) and align with the general east to west wind flow in the region. Approximately 20 miles (32 kilometers) south of the lakes lies Lake Mackay, the fourth largest salt lake in Australia.

Photo Credit: NASA

Comments are closed.