Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Image Shows Shanghai, Beijing, Massive Sedimentation
The Copernicus Sentinel-3A looks at an extremely populous portion...
Join GITA in Tampa – March 2019!
GITA is proud to announce along with our local...
CoreLogic and Esri Expand Premium Content Offerings
CoreLogic® (NYSE: CLGX), a leading global property information, analytics...
OGC Calls for Participation in Vector Tiles Pilot
The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) has released a Call...
Azteca Systems Releases Cityworks 15.3
Cityworks–Azteca Systems announced the release of Cityworks 15.3, the...

Click on image to enlarge.

Astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) photographed striking views of Pavlof Volcano on May 18, 2013. The oblique perspective from the ISS reveals the ash plume’s 3-D structure, which often is obscured by the traditional nadir views of most remote sensing satellites.

Situated in the Aleutian Arc about 625 miles (1,000 kilometers) southwest of Anchorage, Pavlof began erupting on May 13, 2013. The volcano jetted lava into the air and spewed an ash cloud 20,000 feet (6,000 meters) high. The volcanic plume extended southeastward over the North Pacific Ocean.

Image courtesy of NASA.

Read the full story.

Comments are closed.