Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Final Pléiades Neo Satellites Ready to Join Rest of Family
The last two satellites of the Airbus-built, owned and...
Septentrio makes GNSS/INS integration easy and fast
Inertial receiver set-up is significantly simplified with the new...
USGIF Announces New Scholarships and a New Working Group Focused on Diversity, Inclusion, and Belonging
USGIF announces new multi-year scholarships from Maxar and Evona...
Improving the Bottom Line through Digital Transformation
ASME’s Robotics for Inspection & Maintenance Summit Will Address...
Topcon continues its commitment to Bridges to Prosperity, donates auto levels
Bridges to Prosperity constructs trail bridges to improve the...

A false-color image of the Salar de Uyuni from the European Space Agency Proba-V satellite shows wavy patterns visible on the western side, while blue shades on the northern and eastern edges indicate flooded areas. The small rectangular patches to the south of the salt flat indicate a large lithium mining area. (Credit: ESA/Belspo – produced by VITO)

Covering 10,500 square kilometers, Bolivia’s Salar de Uyuni is the world’s largest salt plain. Located in the highlands of southwestern Bolivia at an altitude of 3,650 meters, Salar de Uyuni is extremely flat, varying less than 1 meter across its expanse. It’s so flat that it’s often used to calibrate laser and radar altimeters on satellites.

The salt plains were formed 30,000-40,000 years ago as a result of transformations between several prehistoric lakes. The crusty top layer, several meters thick in places, lies on a brine rich in lithium (containing 50-70 percent of the world’s reserves), potassium and magnesium.

Comments are closed.