Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Quantum Spatial Streamlines Access to Oregon’s High Resolution Imagery on New Online Portal
PORTLAND, Ore.- Quantum Spatial, Inc. (QSI), the nation’s largest...
Esri Releases Ready-to-Use US Census Bureau Data in ArcGIS Living Atlas
REDLANDS, Calif.- Esri, the global leader in location intelligence,...
XYO Network Headed to Space – Definitive Agreement Executed to Bring XYO Into Orbit With Launch of Blockchain Satellite on SpaceX Falcon 9
SAN DIEGO - XYO Network, the technology that bridges...
Accela Announces Experienced Technology Leader Gary Kovacs as CEO
SAN RAMON, Calif.- Accela, the leading provider of cloud-based solutions...
EagleView Remains Front Runner in Aerial Imagery with Acquisition of Spookfish
Bothell, WA  – EagleView, the leading provider of high-resolution...

Astronaut Luca Parmitano is shown here with his camera inside the cupola on the International Space Station.

More than 230 miles above Earth, aboard the International Space Station, is a seven-window observatory module called the Cupola—the largest window in space.

That's where Italian astronaut Luca Parmitano spends time taking photos of Earth. From the cupola, Parmitano photographs the abstract patterns of the planet below: remnants of a meteor impact crater in Africa, threads of wild green rivers in the Andes and calculated intersections of a North American city.

Of all the things he's photographed, Parmitano says the most surprising thing he's seen is a rare weather phenomenon called noctilucent clouds.

"They look incredibly ethereal and fragile," he writes. "Pictures only convey a dim view of their beauty."

Image courtesy of ESA/NASA.

Read the full story.

Comments are closed.