Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
AgEagle Aerial Systems Announces Pricing of $10 Million Registered Direct Offering
WICHITA, Kan.- AgEagle Aerial Systems Inc. (NYSE American: UAVS)...
Exodigo Underground Imaging Platform Helps Utility Infrastructure Engineering and Construction Company Avoid 50 Percent More Utility Hits
Charge Reduces Construction Costs and Risks With Exodigo Platform...
MissionGO Provides Michigan’s First Real-World Cargo Delivery Operations via UAS
DETROIT - MissionGO Unmanned Systems, a global leader in...
CoreLogic Names Patrick Dodd CEO
IRVINE, Calif.- CoreLogic announced today that Patrick Dodd has...
Nation’s 1st Drone-on-Demand App Now Downloadable on All Devices
-AQUILINE DRONES CREATES STREAMLINED DRONE ORDERING SYSTEM FOR CONSUMER...

The SUAVe system, developed by Vanderbilt and Aurora Flight Sciences, should dramatically reduce the time it takes to map archaeological sites.

Archaeological sites that currently take years to map will be completed in minutes if unmanned aircraft tests under way in Peru go well.

The new system is being developed at Vanderbilt University, comprising an Aurora Flight Sciences unmanned aerial vehicle integrated into a larger system that combines the flying device that can fit into a backpack with a software system that can discern an optimal flight pattern and transform the resulting data into 3-D maps.

The project is an interdisciplinary collaboration between Vanderbilt archaeologist Steven Wernke and engineering professor Julie A. Adams. They call it SUAVe, which stands for Semi-autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicle. The project was partially financed by an Interdisciplinary Discovery Grant from Vanderbilt.

Image courtesy of Anne Rayner, Vanderbilt University.

Read the full story.

Comments are closed.