Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Power Outages in Puerto Rico
After being struck by fierce winds, torrential rainfall, and...
Trimble Ventures Invests in Civ Robotics–A Construction Tech Startup Focused on Autonomous Surveying Solutions
SUNNYVALE, Calif. - Trimble Ventures, Trimble's (NASDAQ: TRMB) corporate...
HawkEye 360 Adds New Radar and Communication Signals to RFGeo Product
New UHF and VHF signals enable customers to detect...
Palmetto Launches New Enterprise Software Platform to Accelerate Residential Clean Energy and Rooftop Solar Adoption
First-of-its-kind platform will operate under new business unit led...
RDARS Selects ModalAI’s VOXL2 Platform for its Eagle Eye Drone and Commences Drone Production
TORONTO - RDARS Inc. ("RDARS" or the "Company") (CSE: RDRS),...

September 25, 2018
Spotlight on Sea-Level Rise

image

On average between 1993 and 2018, sea level has risen by 3.2 millimeters, but there are regional differences within this trend. This map is based on measurements from satellite altimeters and shows regional sea-level trends. (Credit: CNES/LEGOS/CLS/EU Copernicus Marine Service/contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data)

Scientists recently gathered in the Azores to share findings on how satellites have revealed changes in the height of the sea, ice, inland bodies of water and more. Of concern to all is the fact that global sea level has not only been rising steadily over the last 25 years, but recently it is rising at a much faster rate.

The 25 Years of Progress in Radar Altimetry Symposium gives participants the opportunity to share information gained from this particular sort of satellite instrument.

Radar altimeters record surface topography along the satellite’s ground track. They precisely measure the height of water, land and ice by timing the interval between the transmission and reception of very short radar pulses.

This is the only technology that can measure, systematically and globally, changes in the height of the ocean—and is therefore essential for monitoring sea-level rise. The 25-year record of altimetry data allows scientists to determine trends.

Comments are closed.