Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Swift ​​Navigation ​​Announces SBAS Support for ​​Piksi Multi
San Francisco, CA — Swift Navigation, ​​a ​​San ​​Francisco-based...
American Geographical Society to Award Samuel Finley Breese Morse Medal to Dr. Christopher Baruth
The Samuel Finley Breese Morse Medal, awarded by the...
MAPS™ SLs Emulator for Simulation of Location Based Services in LTE Network
GAITHERSBURG, Md. - GL Communications Inc., a global leader...
Woolpert Awarded $2M PennDOT Photogrammetry Contract
HARRISBURG, Pa.- The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) has...
Deimos Imaging Awarded Contract Exceeding USD $2.6M by the Brazilian Ministry of Defence
MADRID and VANCOUVER - UrtheCast Corp. (TSX: UR) ("UrtheCast"...

Acquired on April 13, 2014 by Sentinel-1A, this image shows the extent of flooding in the Caprivi Plain from the Zambezi River in Namibia. The image was downloaded two hours after acquisition, and the resulting products were available in less than an hour. Such images can be taken in adverse weather conditions and during the dark, demonstrating the value of Sentinel-1’s radar vision.

One of the European Space Agency’s Sentinel-1 satellite’s first images was crucial in helping Namibian authorities decide how to respond to a serious flood.

In recent years, floods in Namibia have affected hundreds of thousands of people, destroying homes and washing away vital crops and livestock. In this region, floods also bring further suffering in the form of disease, such as malaria and cholera.

Monitoring these devastating floods is normally hampered by the weather because sensors on aircraft can’t see through the clouds and are limited to relatively small areas. It is also impractical to try to access remote flood-stricken areas on the ground. Therefore, satellites carrying radars, with the capability of imaging through clouds and during the dark, are essential for monitoring floods.

Image courtesy of European Space Agency.

 

Read the full story.

Comments are closed.