Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Fugro’s Geo-data technology to ‘preserve’ Cosquer Cave prehistoric art
The French Ministry of Culture has awarded Fugro a...
xyzt.ai Becomes a Member of the Open Geospatial Consortium
xyzt.ai kicks off its OGC membership by presenting at...
Dedrone Achieves CPNI Certification for Second Year Running
SAN FRANCISCO- Airspace security technology leader Dedrone has been...
Epson Debuts Production-Class Line of SureColor T-Series Wide-Format Printers for CAD and Graphics Applications
Delivering Fastest in Class Print Speeds,1 the SureColor T7770D...
Teledyne Optech launches CZMIL SuperNova, a full geospatial bathymetric lidar solution with industry-leading depth penetration
The CZMIL SuperNova is powered by Teledyne CARIS processing...

NASA's Global Hawk soars aloft from Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. The NASA Global Hawk is well-suited for hurricane investigations.

Beginning this summer and for several years, NASA will send drones dubbed “severe storm sentinels” above severe storms to uncover hurricane formation and intensity-change information.

Several NASA centers are joining federal and university partners in the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) airborne mission targeted to investigate the processes that underlie hurricane formation and intensity change in the Atlantic Ocean basin.

NASA's unmanned sentinels are autonomously flown. The NASA Global Hawk can over-fly hurricanes at altitudes greater than 60,000 feet with flight durations of up to 28 hours, something piloted aircraft would find nearly impossible to do.

Global Hawks were used in the agency’s 2010 Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes hurricane mission and the Global Hawk Pacific environmental science mission. HS3 will use two Global Hawk aircraft and six different instruments this summer, flying from a base of operations at Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.

Image courtesy of NASA/Tony Landis.

Read the full story.

Comments are closed.