Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
AgEagle Aerial Systems Announces Pricing of $10 Million Registered Direct Offering
WICHITA, Kan.- AgEagle Aerial Systems Inc. (NYSE American: UAVS)...
Exodigo Underground Imaging Platform Helps Utility Infrastructure Engineering and Construction Company Avoid 50 Percent More Utility Hits
Charge Reduces Construction Costs and Risks With Exodigo Platform...
MissionGO Provides Michigan’s First Real-World Cargo Delivery Operations via UAS
DETROIT - MissionGO Unmanned Systems, a global leader in...
CoreLogic Names Patrick Dodd CEO
IRVINE, Calif.- CoreLogic announced today that Patrick Dodd has...
Nation’s 1st Drone-on-Demand App Now Downloadable on All Devices
-AQUILINE DRONES CREATES STREAMLINED DRONE ORDERING SYSTEM FOR CONSUMER...

Shown within the white box is the location of the crater in Victoria Land, East Antarctica, at about 73ºS and 156ºE. The color scale shows height derived from CryoSat data.

The European Space Agency’s CryoSat satellite has found a vast crater in Antarctica’s icy surface that may have been left behind when a lake lying under about 3 kilometers of ice suddenly drained.

Far below the thick ice sheet that covers Antarctica, there are lakes of fresh water without a direct connection to the ocean. These lakes are of great interest to scientists who are trying to understand water transport and ice dynamics beneath the frozen Antarctic surface—but this information isn’t easy to obtain.

One method is to drill holes through kilometers of ice to the water—a difficult endeavor in the harsh conditions of the polar regions. But instead of looking down toward the ice, a team of European scientists is looking to the sky to improve our understanding of subglacial water and its transport.

By combining new measurements acquired by CryoSat with older data from NASA’s ICESat satellite, the team has mapped the large crater left behind by a lake and even determined the scale of the flood that formed it.

Image courtesy of ESA/M. McMillan.

Read the full story.

Comments are closed.