Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Verus® Research Awarded U.S. Army Contract for Directed Energy System Placement Analysis Capability
Albuquerque, N.M. – Verus® Research, a New Mexico-based team...
Map of the Month: GfK Retail Purchasing Power, Germany 2021
GfK’s Map of the Month for December shows the...
Space Foundation Opens Registration for 37th Space Symposium, To Be Held April 4-7, 2022
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo.  — Space Foundation, a nonprofit advocate...
UP42 Joins the BDI NewSpace Initiative on Its Mission to Foster the German Economy and Innovation
The Berlin-based geospatial start-up becomes an official member of...
Introducing TomTom IndiGO: The world’s first open digital cockpit software platform for carmakers
AMSTERDAM - TomTom (TOM2), the geolocation technology specialist, today...
: Landsat 8 captured this image of Wallops Island and the surrounding area on May 3, 2014. A variety of launch-related infrastructure is visible along the coast, including rocket storage and assembly buildings, launch pads and protective sea walls. A causeway and bridge connect the island with the Delmarva Peninsula.

Landsat 8 captured this image of Wallops Island and the surrounding area on May 3, 2014. A variety of launch-related infrastructure is visible along the coast, including rocket storage and assembly buildings, launch pads and protective sea walls. A causeway and bridge connect the island with the Delmarva Peninsula.

Where wild ponies once roamed the marshes and beaches, today Wallops Island is the site of a thriving spaceport that launches several commercial and government rockets each year.

Wallops has a long history with rockets. On July 4, 1945, NASA’s predecessor—the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA)—launched the first rocket from Wallops, making the island one of the oldest launch sites in the world.

Since then, more than 14,000 rockets have lifted off. While most involved modestly sized meteorological and sounding rockets, the completion of launch pad 0A at the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport (MARS) in 2011 has made it possible to launch larger and more powerful rockets.

Image courtesy of NASA.

Read the full story.

Comments are closed.