Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Death Valley Flash Flooding
In early August 2022, flash floods soaked Furnace Creek...
Golden Software Enhances Grapher Package with Improved Axes, Plotting, and 3D Functionality
GOLDEN, Colorado – Golden Software, a developer of affordable...
Esri India Marches Ahead with 51% Indian Ownership
New Delhi: Esri India, the country's leading Geographic Information...
Trimble RTX Integrity Validates Positioning Data Accuracy to Support Safety-Critical Applications
Providing Even More Reliable Measurements for Users of Trimble...
Esri Renews NTIS Partnership Supporting White House Priorities with Access to Geographic Data
REDLANDS, Calif.— The Biden administration has prioritized goals relating...
: Landsat 8 captured this image of Wallops Island and the surrounding area on May 3, 2014. A variety of launch-related infrastructure is visible along the coast, including rocket storage and assembly buildings, launch pads and protective sea walls. A causeway and bridge connect the island with the Delmarva Peninsula.

Landsat 8 captured this image of Wallops Island and the surrounding area on May 3, 2014. A variety of launch-related infrastructure is visible along the coast, including rocket storage and assembly buildings, launch pads and protective sea walls. A causeway and bridge connect the island with the Delmarva Peninsula.

Where wild ponies once roamed the marshes and beaches, today Wallops Island is the site of a thriving spaceport that launches several commercial and government rockets each year.

Wallops has a long history with rockets. On July 4, 1945, NASA’s predecessor—the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA)—launched the first rocket from Wallops, making the island one of the oldest launch sites in the world.

Since then, more than 14,000 rockets have lifted off. While most involved modestly sized meteorological and sounding rockets, the completion of launch pad 0A at the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport (MARS) in 2011 has made it possible to launch larger and more powerful rockets.

Image courtesy of NASA.

Read the full story.

Comments are closed.