Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Deseret UAS Partnership Awarded Highly Competitive NASA & FAA Programs
TOOELE COUNTY- The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) recently...
MyDefence introduces a modular anti-drone solution for airports, prisons and military bases
Cary, NC – February 19, 2019 – For the past...
Airbus turns imagery into insight with The OneAtlas Platform
Toulouse, 19 February 2019 – Airbus Defence and Space...
Nanotron and ClearBlade partner to deliver 360° Edge Analytics
►  Nanotron has deepened its partnership with Internet of Things...
Badger Maps Launches New and Improved Android App
San Francisco, California - Badger Maps, a mapping and...

FAA granted permission to the Nevada UAS test site team to fly a ScanEagle UAS at or below 3,000 feet, monitored by a visual observer and mission commander.

FAA granted permission to the Nevada UAS test site team to fly a ScanEagle UAS at or below 3,000 feet, monitored by a visual observer and mission commander.

The Federal Aviation Administration announced on June 9, 2014, that the state of Nevada’s unmanned aircraft system (UAS) test site is ready to conduct research vital to integrating UASs into the nation’s airspace.

“Nevada has been on the leading edge of aerospace flight testing for almost 70 years,” said Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. “Today, the state continues that tradition by contributing to the safe and efficient integration of unmanned aircraft into the U.S. aviation system.”

FAA granted the Nevada team a two-year Certificate of Waiver or Authorization (COA) to use an Insitu ScanEagle UAS at the Desert Rock Airport  in Mercury, Nev. Desert Rock Airport, owned and operated by the Department of Energy, is a private airport and not for general use. The ScanEagle will fly at or below 3,000 feet, monitored by a visual observer and mission commander. Initial flights will verify that a UAS can operate safely at the airport.

Nevada’s research will concentrate on UAS standards and operations as well as operator standards and certification requirements. The site’s activities also will include a concentrated look at how air traffic control procedures will evolve with the introduction of UAS into the civil environment and how these aircraft will integrate with NextGen, the modernization of the national airspace system.

Image courtesy of Insitu.

Read the full FAA release.

Comments are closed.