Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
AgEagle Announces First Quarter 2022 Results
Supply Chain Challenges Impact First Quarter Results; Expects Strong...
Help from Space sees Local Governments keep the Lights On
Veritas Imagery Services and NOKTOsat are collaborating to provide...
Phase One Announces Next-Generation Aerial Solutions Enhanced with Near Infrared Capabilities Ideal for Agriculture, Environment, Land Management
COPENHAGEN, 18 May 2022 – Phase One, a leading...
UP42 and Airbus Launch Copernicus Masters Challenge for Sustainable Urban Planning
Calling on all developers and researchers to leverage remote...
Colourisation and immersive walkthroughs among major GeoSLAM updates
GeoSLAM has announced the official launch of its ZEB...

On Feb. 21, the De Gray River was barely visible in imagery collected by NASA’s Terra satellite.

Tropical Cyclone Rusty made landfall in northwestern Australia in late February 2013, prompting the Australian Bureau of Meteorology to issue a flood warning for the catchment of the De Gray River.

On March 4, the river’s channels showed up clearly. High water also pooled near the coast between Port Hedland and Pardoo.

Coming ashore east of Port Hedland, the storm brought strong winds and heavy rains to the community of Pardoo. Higher water in Rusty’s wake was apparent when NASA’s Terra satellite captured the accompanying March 4, 2013, image. For comparison, the accompanying Feb. 21, 2013, image shows conditions observed before the storm.

Both images use a combination of visible and infrared light to better distinguish between water and land. Water varies in color from pale blue-green to navy and darker shades of blue—lighter water carries sediment, while darker water is relatively sediment-free or significantly deeper. Vegetation is bright green, and bare ground is earth-toned. Clouds are nearly white and cast shadows.

Images courtesy of NASA.

Read the full story.

Comments are closed.