Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
MGISS Helps Northumbrian Water Mitigate Risk from Trees
Liverpool, UK - Northumbrian Water using satellite positioning and...
Kratos Introduces OpenSpace™ Virtual Network Functions for Earth Observation Satellite Missions
SAN DIEGO - Kratos Defense & Security Solutions, Inc....
Hivemapper Builds Global Decentralized Mapping Network, Offers Cash for Aerial and Ground-Level 3D Video
BURLINGAME, Calif.-Hivemapper, the company building an intelligent, global decentralized...
BAE Systems Selected to Develop Attritable Air Vehicle Systems Under the U.S. Air Force Skyborg Program
ENDICOTT, N.Y.- BAE Systems has been awarded an indefinite...
Huawei Selects TomTom to Power Petal Maps
AMSTERDAM - TomTom (TOM2), the location technology specialist, today...

Over the last several weeks, NASA satellite measurements have revealed significant reductions in air pollution over the major metropolitan areas of the Northeast United States. Similar reductions have been observed in other regions of the world. These recent improvements in air quality have come at a high cost, as communities grapple with widespread lockdowns and shelter-in-place orders as a result of the spread of COVID-19.

Nitrogen dioxide, primarily emitted from burning fossil fuels for transportation and electricity generation, can be used as an indicator of changes in human activity. These images show average concentrations of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide as measured by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on NASA’s Aura satellite, as processed by a team at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. The left image shows the average concentration in March of 2015-19, while the right image shows the average concentration measured in March 2020.

Though variations in weather from year to year cause variations in the monthly means for individual years, March 2020 shows the lowest monthly atmospheric nitrogen dioxide levels of any March during the OMI data record, which spans 2005 to the present. In fact, the data indicate that the nitrogen dioxide levels in March 2020 are about 30 percent lower on average across the region of the I-95 corridor from Washington, D.C., to Boston than when compared to the March mean of 2015-19. Further analysis will be required to rigorously quantify the amount of the change in nitrogen dioxide levels associated with changes in emissions versus natural variations in weather.

Image Credit: NASA

Comments are closed.