Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
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Maps show the tropospheric nitrogen dioxide column in the Southeast United States from March 15-April 15, 2015-2019 Average (left) as well as March 15-April 15, 2020 Average (right). (Credit: NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio)

Scientists are using information from NASA’s Earth-observing satellites, on-the-ground sensors and computer-based datasets to study the environmental, economic and societal impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, the agency’s Earth Science Division recently sponsored new projects to examine how the shutdowns in response to the pandemic are changing the environment, especially the atmosphere, and determine what, if any, natural environmental phenomena might impact the spread of the pandemic.

“NASA has a unique role to play in response to this crisis,” said John Haynes, NASA’s program manager for Health and Air Quality Applications. “As we continue to collect Earth-observing satellite data on a global scale, we can aid in the understanding of global changes resulting from the pandemic as well as investigate potential environmental signals that may influence the spread of COVID-19.”

NASA recently funded two new rapid-turnaround projects focused on COVID-19. Jennifer Kaiser at Georgia Institute of Technology and Elena Lind at Virginia Polytechnic Institute are examining the pandemic’s impact on air quality related to reduced airport traffic. Joanna Joiner and Bryan Duncan at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center are creating maps and images that show how COVID-19 has reduced air pollution across the world.

 

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