Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Airbus expands its SpaceDataHighway with second satellite
Paris, 16 July 2020 – The EDRS-C satellite, the...
GeoComm’s Jody Sayre Named To Esri’s Partner Advisory Network
St. Cloud, MN: GeoComm today announced the nomination and...
Remsoft Adds General Manager in Asia Pacific to Support Client Success and Regional Growth
Remsoft announced today the appointment of Corinne Watson as...
NEXA Advisors and the Vertical Flight Society Announce Equity Partnership in UAM Geomatics, Inc.
NEXA Advisors and the Vertical Flight Society (VFS) have...
4 Earth Intelligence and Ordnance Survey Partner to Reveal the World from Satellites
Bristol, UK – Earth observation company 4 Earth Intelligence (4EI)...

Data collected from Dec. 21, 2017, to Feb. 23, 2018, in this NASA TMPA rainfall anomaly analysis indicated that parts of the upper Midwest have had 5 millimeters (0.2 inches) of precipitation per day above normal so far this winter. (Credit: NASA/Hal Pierce)

Much of the U.S. Midwest received above normal precipitation this winter, and a NASA rainfall analysis provided a look at the precipitation that contributed to current flooding.

Recent heavy rainfall and melting snow has caused flooding from eastern Texas to Michigan. Major flooding is expected along the Ohio River in Illinois and Kentucky. On Feb. 23, 2018, the National Weather Service noted that several locations along the Ohio River near Louisville were under flood warnings. Parts of Arkansas and Indiana also are preparing for major flooding.

At NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, a rainfall anomaly analysis was made by comparing rainfall data compiled during the 12-year period from 2001 to 2012 to “near real-time” Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA-RT 3B42RT) data collected from Dec. 21, 2017 to Feb. 23, 2018.

The National Weather Service noted on Feb. 23, “The heavy rainfall that began last week and continued over the weekend has brought widespread flooding to the central and southern U.S., from the Gulf Coast to the Great Lakes. Numerous river systems will remain in flood stage this week. Another round of rainfall is forecast across the Lower/Mid-Miss. and Tenn. River Valleys Tuesday into Wednesday, which will exacerbate the ongoing flood threat.”

Comments are closed.