Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
HERE Workspace: The low-code platform tool for map creation now comes with machine learning from AWS
HERE Workspace adds new low-code mapmaking capabilities and now...
CHC Navigation launches the version 8 of its Landstar Field Data Collection Software
The ultimate survey and mapping software covering all surveyors’...
FARO Press Release for SiteScape Acquisition
Lake Mary, Fla – FARO Technologies, Inc. (Nasdaq: FARO), a...
Teledyne Geospatial to demonstrate advanced bathymetric hardware and software solutions at HYDRO22
Vaughan, Ontario, CANADA – November 29, 2022 – Teledyne...
Presagis and Airbus Partner to Provide VELOCITY 5D Users Direct Access to OneAtlas Satellite Imagery
Production and Updating of 3D Digital Twins Montreal, Canada —...

The island of Mauritius has declared a ‘state of environmental emergency’ after a grounded vessel began leaking metric tons of oil into the Indian Ocean. Satellite images, which show the dark slick spreading in the nearby waters, are being used to monitor the ongoing spill.

The MV Wakashio vessel, reported to be carrying nearly 4,000 metric tons of oil, ran aground on a coral reef on Mauritius’ southeast coast on July 25, 2020. According to media reports, more than 1,000 metric tons of fuel have leaked from the cracked vessel into the ocean, polluting the nearby coral reefs as well as the surrounding beaches and lagoons.

In this image, captured on Aug. 11, 2020, by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission, the MV Wakashio, visible in the bottom of the image, is stranded close to Pointe d’Esny, an important wetland area. The oil slick can be seen as a thin, black line surrounded by the bright turquoise colors of the Indian Ocean. Oil is visible near the boat as well as other locations around the lagoon.

In response to the spill, the International Charter Space and Major Disasters was activated on Aug. 8. The charter is an international collaboration that gives rescue and aid workers rapid access to satellite data in the event of a disaster. A full report that provides a preliminary assessment of the oil spill is available here.

Image Credit: Contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2020), processed by ESA.

 

Comments are closed.