Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
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Mars Rover Perseverance successfully landed on “the Red Planet” on Feb. 18, 2021, and it features a variety of innovative sensors and robotics to carry out its mission. Teledyne Technologies, for example, contributed several of its image sensors to form part of the complex instrumentation onboard the Mars Rover Perseverance. Teledyne sensors will power, sense and help analyze the chemical composition of the surface and minerals, including Gy and atmosphere during the Mars 2020 mission.

The Mars 2020 mission addresses high-priority scientific goals, including the search for signs of past microbial life and, more importantly, answers to address the question of the potential for life on Mars. Providing opportunities to gather knowledge and demonstrate technologies that address the challenges of future human expeditions to Mars, the mission will include testing a method for producing oxygen from the Martian atmosphere; identifying other resources (subsurface water); improving landing techniques; and characterizing weather, dust, and other potential environmental conditions that could affect future astronauts living and working on Mars. 

Teledyne provided CCD image sensors to drive both the SuperCam and Scanning Habitable Environments with Raman & Luminescence for Organics & Chemicals (SHERLOC) instruments that will search for organic compounds and minerals, determining if they have been altered by watery environments, and proving signs of past microbial life on the planet.

 

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