Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Mozambique Braces for Tropical Cyclone Kenneth
Just five weeks after enduring the worst natural disaster...
Brazil’s Civil Aviation Authority Approves senseFly Drones for Country’s First-Ever Beyond Visual-Line-Of-Sight (BVLOS) Operations
Cheseaux, Switzerland, April 24 2019 – senseFly, the leading...
3rd Commercial UAV Expo Europe A Huge Success, With Nearly Double The Attendance Of Prior Edition
AMSTERDAM THE NETHERLANDS – The third annual Commercial UAV...
Teledyne Imaging to Showcase its Advanced Mapping, Object Recognition and Tracking Technology at AUVSI 2019
Waterloo, Canada – April 24, 2019 –Teledyne Optech, Teledyne...
Solv3D Releases New Features and Pricing Model
CALGARY – April 24, 2019 – While Exhibiting at...

This image from the Copernicus Sentinel-2A satellite takes us over Lake Chad at the southern edge of the Sahara, where water supplies are dwindling. The rapid decline of the lake’s waters in just 34 years is clear to see in this comparison with an image acquired on Nov. 6, 1984, by the U.S. Landsat 5 satellite.

Once one of Africa’s largest lakes, Lake Chad has shrunk by approximately 90 percent since the 1960s. The receding water is due to a reduction of precipitation, induced by climate change, as well as development of modern irrigation systems for agriculture and the increasing human demand for freshwater.

Straddling the border of Chad, Niger, Cameroon and Nigeria, the lake is a major source of freshwater for millions of people in the area. It is also a source for irrigation and fishing, and it was once rich in biodiversity.

As the lake continues to dry up, many farmers and herders move toward greener areas or larger cities to seek alternative work. Several attempts have been made to replenish these shrinking waters, but little progress has been achieved.

The borders of the lake’s body are only partly visible in this image—the majority of the shoreline is swamp and marsh. The Chari River, visible snaking its way towards Lake Chad at the bottom of the image, provides more than 90 percent of the lake’s waters. It flows from the Central African Republic, following the Cameroon border from N'Djamena, where it joins with its main tributary the Logone River.

Image Credit: Contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2018), processed by ESA

Comments are closed.