Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
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Google’s new high-resolution imagery includes this view of Mecca, showing the world’s tallest clock tower, the Abraj Al Bait or Mecca Royal Hotel Clock Tower.

Several days after Microsoft said Bing Maps completed its U.S. high-resolution image project, Google reported it increased the amount of high-resolution imagery on its geospatial websites.

“Improving the availability of more high-quality imagery is one of the many ways we’re continuing to bring you the most comprehensive and accurate maps of the world,” wrote Eric Kolb, a “geodata strategist” at Google, in an official company blog post.

Specifically, Kolb wrote that Google had added updated aerial imagery for 20 locations, satellite imagery for 60 regions and Google’s new “45-degree” angle imagery—which, rather than straight down, shows locations from a slight sideways tilt, giving them more depth.

“This angle enables people to explore the sides of buildings, rotate around a particular point of interest and see it from different perspectives, and get a more complete and realistic view of an area,” a Google spokesperson added.

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