Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
BlackSky Announces Next Generation Dual Payload Satellite Architecture to Deliver High Resolution and Nighttime Imaging Capabilities
HERNDON, Va.- BlackSky, a leading provider of global monitoring...
Draganfly Selected as Sole Provider of Smart Vital Sign and Social Distancing Equipment
Los Angeles, California - Draganfly Inc. (OTCQB: DFLYF) (CSE:...
Esri and AfroChampions Launch Partnership to Promote GIS in Africa
Redlands, Calif., United States:  Esri, the global leader in location...
Verizon deploys remote network-connected drone during Big Hollow Wildfire
PORTLAND, Ore.- The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) granted Skyward,...
United Launches Online ‘Map Search’ Feature, A First Among U.S. Airlines
CHICAGO - Let's say you live in Chicago, have $250 to spend...

On Nov. 1, 2018, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8 captured a false-color view of flooding along the Nueces River in a series of storms that have delivered historic amounts of rain to central Texas. The remnants of the category 3 storm, Hurricane Willa, weakened Texas’ dry terrain, pushing in a stream of moisture and rain. The deluge saturated soils, overfilled lakes and reservoirs, and pushed rivers over their banks. One river even flowed backwards. Dallas Fort Worth Airport recorded 39.77 centimeters (15.66 inches) of rain in October 2018, making it the wettest October on record there, according to the National Weather Service.

Image Credit: NASA/Joshua Stevens, using Landsat data from the U.S. Geological Survey and IMERG data from the Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) at NASA/GSFC

 

Comments are closed.