Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Trimble to Acquire Viewpoint to Create the Industry’s Most Complete Construction Management Solution
SUNNYVALE, Calif.—Trimble (NASDAQ: TRMB) announced today it has entered...
Teledyne Optech’s Dr. Paul LaRocque to Deliver Keynote Address at ISPRS TC III Symposium
April 25, 2018 — Teledyne Optech is pleased to...
Satellite Imagery Sheds Light on Agricultural Water Use
The most significant draw on the water supply is...
New ‘Spatial Manager’ 4.2 Released
The “spring” version of ‘Spatial Manager’ (4.2) adds the...
Esri Releases ArcGIS Pro Workstation Customized for the Intelligence Community
Redlands, California—Esri, the global leader in spatial analytics, today...

January 23, 2014
Earth Explorer to Measure Aerosol Levels and Winds

The Earth Explorer satellite will provide timely and accurate profiles of the world’s winds and further information on aerosols and clouds. The mission will advance our understanding of atmospheric dynamics. It also will provide much-needed information to improve weather forecasts and contribute to climate research.

The European Space Agency’s Earth Explorer satellite will carry some of the most challenging technology ever put into orbit, including a novel Doppler wind light detection and ranging (LiDAR) sensor, a large telescope and sensitive receivers.

Named after Aeolus, who in Greek mythology was appointed as “keeper of the winds” by the gods, the Atmospheric Dynamics Mission (ADM) is slated for launch next year. The satellite carries a single instrument: a Doppler wind LiDAR called Aladin. The sophisticated instrument is designed to probe the lowermost 30 kilometers of the atmosphere along the satellite’s orbital path. Comprising a powerful laser, a large telescope and a sensitive receiver, Aladin will be the first wind LiDAR in space.

In cloud-free air, the LiDAR sensor will probe the atmosphere down to Earth’s surface or to the top of dense clouds. Data on wind will be ingested in weather models to improve forecasts. Improved weather forecasts have considerable socio-economic benefits, particularly for extreme weather events. For example, the better prediction of the strength and path of an evolving hurricane system is important for local emergency management.

Image courtesy of European Space Agency.

Read the full story.

Comments are closed.