Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Mahr Appoints Manuel Hüsken as CEO
Former CEO Stephan Gais moves to advisory board position...
Seoul Robotics Introduces New Deployment Ready LiDAR Perception System
ANN ARBOR, Mich.- Seoul Robotics, a 3D computer vision...
EarthDaily Analytics Announces Timeline for the Launch of Next Generation Satellite Constellation
VANCOUVER, BC- EarthDaily Analytics Corp., a vertically-integrated data processing...
MSA Safety Announces Investment and Collaboration Agreement with Swiss Autonomous Drone Technology Firm to Enhance Fire Service Offerings
PITTSBURGH - MSA Safety Incorporated (NYSE: MSA), the global leader in...
New Esri Book Introduces Young Readers to Spatial Thinking
REDLANDS, Calif.-Esri, the global leader in location intelligence, today...

This 1961 spy satellite photo shows Tell Rifaat in northwest Syria. Now the area is surrounded by a modern town.

A study of declassified Cold War spy satellite photos has tripled the number of known archaeological sites across the Middle East, revealing thousands of ancient cities, roads, canals and other ruins.

“Some of these sites are gigantic, and they were completely unknown,” says atlas-team archaeologist Jesse Casana of the University of Arkansas, who presented the results at the Society for American Archaeology’s annual meeting in late April. “We can see all kinds of things—ancient roads and canals. The images provide a very comprehensive picture.”

The team had started with a list of roughly 4,500 known archaeological sites across the Middle East. The spy satellite images revealed another 10,000 that previously had been unknown.

Image courtesy of Internet Archaeology/Jesse Casana, Jackson Cothren and Tuna Kalayci, Corona Atlas Project.

Read the full story.

Comments are closed.