Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
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Smoke from wildfires extends hundreds of kilometers off Florida’s east coast.

The Honey Prairie Complex Fire produces most of the smoke, but significant smoke also arises from the Espanola Fire. Distinguishable from clouds by its darker color and less distinct margins, the smoke extends hundreds of kilometers east of the coast.

As of June 16, 2011, the Honey Prairie Complex had already burned 196,369 acres (79,468 hectares). Although it was 49 percent contained, it had the potential to keep growing. The Espanola Fire had consumed 4,306 acres (1,743 hectares) and was about 40 percent contained.

Smoke from Honey Prairie Complex Fire, along with smoke from the Wallow Fire in Arizona, affected air quality in the U.S. Southeast and Mississippi Valley in mid-June 2011, according to the U.S. Air Quality “Smog Blog.”

NASA images courtesy Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, Goddard Space Flight Center. Caption by Michon Scott.

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