Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Ordnance Survey to Open Hub Dedicated to Innovation
Feb. 26, 2015—In a move that aims to energise...
United Nations, DigitalGlobe Sign Agreement to Collaborate on High-Resolution Satellite Imagery and Geospatial Solutions
LONGMONT, Colo., Feb. 26, 2015—DigitalGlobe, a leading global provider...
Student Chapter of the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing to Meet March 4
Feb.27, 2015 — The Kansas State University student chapter...
Agency9 Brings WebGL Streaming of 3D Cities to IOS and Android
Stockholm, Sweden, Feb.27,2015 — Agency9, the leading provider of...
510 Smallsat Launches Planned Over Next Five Years
Paris, Washington D.C., Montreal, Yokohama, February 26, 2015 - According to Euroconsult's...

Click on image to enlarge.

A layer of stratocumulus clouds over the Pacific Ocean served as the backdrop on June 21, 2012, when NASA’s Terra satellite captured this rainbow-like optical phenomenon known as a glory. An added viewing bonus in this image are the swirling von karman vortices visible near the glory.

Glories appear as rings of color in front of mist or fog, forming when water droplets within clouds scatter sunlight back toward an illumination source. Although glories may look similar to rainbows, the way light is scattered to produce them is different. Rainbows are formed by refraction and reflection, but glories are formed by backward diffraction.

The most vivid glories form when an observer looks down on thin clouds with droplets that are between 10 and 30 microns in diameter. The brightest and most colorful glories also form when droplets are roughly the same size.

Glories are usually seen against a background of white clouds. Clouds are white because the sunlight is scattered many times by multiple droplets within the clouds. The white light often obscures details of glories, but without them in the background, the glory would not be visible.

Read the full story.

Comments are closed.