Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Cartegraph and CycloMedia Partner to Deliver Timely, Objective Asset Data to the Public Sector
Cartegraph, a leader in high-performance government software and services,...
Formal Partnership of HeiGIT/GIScience Heidelberg with Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT) Announced
Today HeiGIT/GIScience Research Group Heidelberg and the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap...
ArcGIS Experts, GEO Jobe, Celebrates 18 Years in GIS Software Development, Services, UAV Mapping
Established in 1999, GEO Jobe is pleased to be...
Esri Book Helps Students Put The Science of Where to Work to Make Spatial Decisions
Redlands, California — Making Spatial Decisions Using ArcGIS Pro:...
Dewberry To Lead Lidar Project Covering Six Areas in Northern California
Dewberry has been selected by the U.S. Geological Survey...

Image Acquired July 7, 2011

Image Acquired July 7, 2011

Ordinarily, flashes of white rise from salt pans in South America’s Atacama Desert. But on July 7, 2011, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite acquired theses images, the white came from a far rarer commodity: snow. A cold front dumped up to 80 centimeters of snow (32 inches) on the desert, reported BBC News. These images show the rare snowfall.

The top image provides a photo-like, natural color view of the snow. A few clouds hang over the white desert, marring the view slightly. The lower image, which includes both visible and infrared light, helps distinguish between snow and clouds. Snow is dark red, while clouds are lighter shades of orange and white.

NASA images courtesy the MODIS Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC. Caption by Holli Riebeek.

Comments are closed.