Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Acceleration of L2 to L3 Autonomous Driving by OEMs Fuels Demand for LeddarTech Automotive-Grade LiDARs
QUEBEC CITY - Automotive OEMs are accelerating their efforts to...
FLIR Launches Radar and Thermal Products for Border Patrol and the Dismounted Warfighter
WILSONVILLE, Ore. - FLIR Systems, Inc. (NASDAQ: FLIR) today...
Hexagon’s Positioning Intelligence Attains Major Milestone in the Drive to Safe Autonomy
Calgary, Canada - Hexagon’s Positioning Intelligence division is pleased...
NCTech Unveils iSTAR Pulsar
Edinburgh, UK – NCTech, a developer of reality imaging...
Iridium Completes Sixth Successful Iridium® NEXT Launch
MCLEAN, Va. - Iridium Communications Inc. (NASDAQ:IRDM) announced today...

UrtheCast’s 5-meter-resolution camera will capture any location ISS passes over, generating large strips of 40-kilometer-wide imagery, 365 days a year.

UrtheCast’s 5-meter-resolution camera will capture any location ISS passes over, generating large strips of 40-kilometer-wide imagery, 365 days a year.

An expanded Earth observation data stream, due to new state-of-the-art sensors aboard NASA’s segment of the International Space Station (ISS), may lead to a live stream of Earth. Vancouver-based company UrtheCast plans to install and operate its sensors aboard ISS.

“Having additional sensors on the International Space Station not only mitigates our technology risk, but also adds to our current site of cameras aboard the station,” said Scott Larson, UrtheCast’s CEO, in a media release. “This initiative reflects our belief in the International Space Station as an ideal platform for Earth observation.”

The idea is that, eventually, the sensors on the Earth observation deck, composed of a high-resolution dual-mode optical and video camera and a high-resolution dual-band synthetic aperture radar, could become an accessible live stream of Earth.

“Being both education and scientifically focused, these sensors will help augment NASA’s efforts to more fully utilize the International Space Station as a national lab, while enabling more private-sector participation,” said Michael Read, NASA manager of the station’s National Lab Office.

Image courtesy of UrtheCaste.

Read the full story.

Comments are closed.