Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Frequency Electronics, Inc. Awarded $5.9M Lockheed Martin Contract To Qualify Atomic Clocks for Potential Use on Next Gen GPS IIIF Satellites
MITCHEL FIELD, N.Y.- As a risk reduction effort for...
GA-ASI Part of Aviation Week Laureate Award Winning Team
SAN DIEGO  – Last night at the Aviation Week...
RoboSense Provides LiDAR to GACHA — First Autonomous Driving Shuttle Bus For All Weather Conditions Co-Developed by MUJI & Sensible 4
SHENZHEN, China - RoboSense http://www.robosense.ai, a leader in LiDAR...
Velodyne Lidar CEO Wins Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers’ Autos2050 Award
SAN JOSE, Calif.-The Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers (Auto Alliance),...
FARO® Releases FARO ZONE 3D 2019 for Public Safety
LAKE MARY, Fla. - FARO® (NASDAQ: FARO), the world's most...

Combining Landsat’s three visible bands produces a natural-color view that looks familiar to human eyes: The canopy of Epping Forest is green, the reservoirs near Heathrow Airport are dark blue, and the city itself is gray. Click on image to enlarge.

Landsat 7’s Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus instrument views Earth through eight different wavelengths or bands, creating the three different views you see here.

Read the full story.

 

 

 

Data from one of Landsat 7’s infrared bands (4) has been combined with the green (3) and blue (2) bands to create a 4-3-2 false-color view of London. This is a widely used combination that’s especially useful for vegetation studies. Click on image to enlarge.

This is another type of false-color image made from a combination of Landsat 7’s bands 7, 4 and 2 (two infrared plus green). Bright green spots indicate vegetation, and the waters appear dark blue or black. Urban areas appear as gray or pink, while cleared fields appear tan or purple. Click on image to enlarge.

Comments are closed.