Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
NASA Funds Projects to Make Geosciences Data More Accessible
NASA has funded 11 new projects as part of...
Dewberry’s Sid Pandey Appointed to URISA Vanguard Cabinet
The Urban and Regional Information Systems Association (URISA) has...
Fugro receives US President’s ‘E’ Award for export growth
Fugro in the US has been granted the President’s...
Industry leaders Parrot and Pix4D unite to offer the most complete professional solutions with ANAFI USA
ANAFI USA and the Pix4D software suite now offer...
1Spatial partners with Environment Agency and Defra to enable automatic quality-assured and timely geoCOBie asset information delivery from suppliers
Cambridge, UK- (www.1spatial.com) 1Spatial, a global leader in Location...

September 15, 2020
Spalte Glacier Breaks Up

image

An animated gif can be viewed at this site's homepage: www.eijounal.com

This series of four Copernicus Sentinel-2 images captured between June 29, 2020, and July 24, 2020, shows a segment of the largest ice shelf in the Arctic break up and shatter into a flotilla of small icebergs totalling an area of around 125 square kilometers.

The Nioghalvfjerdsfjorden Ice Shelf, also known as 79N, is the floating front end of the Northeast Greenland ice stream—where it flows off the land and out into the ocean. At its leading edge, the 79N glacier splits in two, with offshoot turning north. It's this offshoot, or tributary, called Spalte Glacier, that has now disintegrated.

With climate change taking a grip, Spalte Glacier’s final separation from the 79N Ice Shelf comes after some years of progressive disintegration. 79N has retreated by about 23 kilometers since 1990, with significant losses over the last two record-breaking warm summers. Numerous ponds can also be seen on top of the remaining ice shelf, a sign of melting in the recent warm air temperatures. The ocean waters beneath the shelf are also likely to have warmed, increasing the risk of melt from below.

79N only recently took claim of being the Arctic’s largest ice shelf after the Petermann glacier, also in northwest Greenland, lost a lot of ice in 2010 and 2012.

Image Credit: Contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2020), processed by ESA.

 

Comments are closed.